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Adding Material Maps & Layers

3.2_Adding Material Maps & Layers

0:03 In the previous lesson, we covered how to replace our standard materials with nicer ones from the V-Ray materials library.

0:12 That worked great for materials that we knew we didn’t want or need to keep in our model…

0:18 but let’s say that for whatever reason we have to keep a particular material or two because it represents a manufacturer’s specification or for whatever other reason.

0:28 In this case, we’re going to want to apply some additional settings to our existing materials in order to get them to look more better and more realistic.

0:39 In this case, we’re going to want to apply some additional settings to our existing materials in order to get them to look more better and more realistic.

0:39 Let’s start with our wood siding.

0:42 Since I like this wood and I don’t want to replace it with anything else – instead I want to add render layers to it to help improve its overall detail.

0:51 Let’s start by adding a bump map that will give the wood grain some depth without adding any additional geometry to our model.

1:00 Let’s start by adding a bump map that will give the wood grain some depth without adding any additional geometry to our model.

1:00 A bump map, in short, is essentially a 2D height map telling V-Ray what parts of the material should be raised or lowered.

1:09 Bump maps are great as they add depth and realism without adding anything to the model itself.

1:18 I’ve provided the bump map for our wood siding with your exercise files.

1:24 But for those of you that might be curious on how it was created...just simply desaturated and boosted the contrast and brightness of your original material and saved it as a new file.

1:39 For this particular texture, the black parts will read as cracks and cervices against the flat or raised white parts of the material.

1:50 For this particular texture, the black parts will read as cracks and cervices against the flat or raised white parts of the material.

1:51 So now to add the bump map, make sure the wood texture is selected as your current material and in the 'Asset Editor'...

2:02 and then turn ‘Bump / Normal Mapping’ on...

2:17 and choose bitmap from our list of options.

2:22 We can then browse to the file location…and that’s it.

2:34 Let’s start up another test render and zoom in to see what difference the bump map may have made.

2:50 Here it is on…and now turned off.

2:56 It's a subtle but important difference.

2:60 Another way to see how little or much the bump map is apparent is by adjusting the time of day…

3:09 …and then watching the shadows hit and fall into all those wood grains, joints, and cracks.

3:17 For practice, let’s repeat this step with the concrete paving.

3:22 With the paving texture selected...turn on the 'Bump' setting again…

3:31 Then expand and choose 'bitmap' from the options…

3:36 And now browse to the paving bump file provided…and that one's done.

3:47 We’ll test render it again and zoom in a bit…

3:57 And toggle the bump on and off to compare the before and after.

4:05 If we wanted to, we could also adjust the strength to make the 3D bumps more or less pronounced.

4:12 But let’s keep it simple and leave it as is for now.

4:17 But let’s keep it simple and leave it as is for now.

4:19 In addition to the paving bump, let’s add another layer to this paving material with the assumption that maybe it’s been sealed or treated and therefore kicks back a subtle reflection or shine.

4:32 This will help increase the drama in our render.

4:35 This is also why they water down paving and driveways for those fancy house photos you see in real estate listings.

4:43 To do this, let’s make some adjustments to the 'reflection' layer in the material.

4:50 Note that if a material you’ve imported doesn’t have a reflection layer, you can add one, or more than one, by clicking this little 'plus sign' in the corner.

5:01 Like everything in V-Ray, there are several differe

5:09 Let’s keep things simple here and just use the ‘Reflection Color’ setting only.

5:15 By default, the color is black, indicating no reflections.

5:20 If we change the color to white, we’d get high reflections like something we’d expect to see on car paint or glass.

5:29 Our goal here is to make subtle changes that add up as we go to create better and better renderings.

5:35 So let’s find a happy medium of a middle grey color.

5:42 And as you can see…that’s starting to look pretty good.

5:46 And as you can see…that’s starting to look pretty good.

5:46 We can start to see some subtle reflections of our building in the pavement which adds a nice bit of realism to our view.

5:54 If you want to learn more about reflection settings and the results they give, check out other pre-made materials in order to see how they were created...

6:03 and pick up on the cues from them so you can apply similar settings to your own custom materials later on.

6:10 That’s it for adding V-Ray render settings to non-V-Ray materials.

6:16 That’s it for adding V-Ray render settings to non-V-Ray materials.

6:16 Of course, there is a lot more you can do to customize your materials to get them exactly the way you want ...