Select Language
Exterior Cabin Model Overview

2.1_Introduction & Model Overview

0:04 Welcome to part two of our ‘Introduction to V-Ray learning track’.

0:09 My name is Eric and I’ll be your instructor for the next several lessons.

0:14 Here we’ll build upon the individual tools and settings discussed previously...

0:19 and then apply them in a logical sequence of steps in order to produce a high-quality exterior rendering of a small modern cabin.

0:28 For these lessons, we’ll be using SketchUp version 2020 and V-Ray NEXT Update 2 for Mac.

0:36 Also keep in mind that these lessons are focused primarily on V-Ray, so we won’t be covering any best practices or SketchUp modeling techniques.

0:45 If you’re new to SketchUp, I suggest you pause here and be sure to check out the ‘SketchUp Fundamentals’ lessons first.

0:54 And one more note about SketchUp 2020, is that ‘Layers’ are now referred to as ‘Tags’.

1:01 And one more note about SketchUp 2020, is that ‘Layers’ are now referred to as ‘Tags’.

1:01 This is just in name only and doesn’t change our workflow or how V-Ray interacts with SketchUp.

1:09 My two goals for these workflow lessons are:

1:13 Firstly, (1.) To Balance the rendering setup time against our desired level quality.

1:19 I know how busy designers are these days and how hard it can be it self-teach seemingly complex software such as V-Ray...

1:27 so I’ll be making every effort to cover the bare minimum of what is necessary to get a render started and looking good quickly.

1:35 My second goal (2.) is to demonstrate a process that creates consistent results

1:41 Additionally, I want to ensure the majority of the process we use here can be replicated later on for your own specific project needs.

1:52 So let’s now take a quick tour of the model that we’ll be working with together on our journey to become rendering pros.

1:59

1:60 As you can see. here, the cabin we're using is from [the] 3D Warehouse...

2:04 and it originally came with a lot more context that we don’t necessarily want.

2:09 I wanted a simple cabin that required us to do just a little bit of work, but no too much, to reflect the real-world constrints of prepping a model for rendering.

2:20 So I went ahead and saved it to its own file in order to isolate just one cabin building.

2:28 So now, focusing on just one cabin, one thing that jumped out at me that needed fixing was the wood siding.

2:36 This was a personal preference of mine to find a lighter and more rustic looking wood board that I knew will ultimately produce a better result.

2:48 The next thing I did was a little bit of group and tag re-organizing.

2:52 I removed the existing tag structure…

3:00 exploded a bunch of nested groups…

3:07 and re-grouped a few key elements by material…

3:17 and finally I assigned those to new tags.

3:21 This will help speed things up later when we replace these current materials with better ones from our default V-Ray library.

3:30 Lastly, I wanted to remove any interior geometry that will not show from the outside to help keep the model light and optimized.

3:39 Using a section plane, I was able to look inside and take anything out that was behind walls…

3:46 like the bathroom furniture, fixtures, stair railing, light switches, etc.

3:52 This might feel like a bit nit-picky and therefor easy to skip over this step...

3:58 but just keep in mind that just one high poly piece of furniture from the 3D Warehouse can easily bloat a model and reduce overall performance.

4:06 but just keep in mind that just one high poly piece of furniture from the 3D Warehouse can easily bloat a model and reduce overall performance.

4:07 Also remember that this is just our starting point and we’re going to be adding more assets and content as we go...

4:14 so it’s worth taking a few minutes at the beginning of the process to check for unnecessary components…

4:21 remove or replace anything that is more detailed, geometry-wise, than is necessary…